Monday 22nd of January 2018 11:19:17 AM

WARNING

Percentage values refer to the width of the parent element.

These properties operate as you'd expect by now. For example, the following two rules will give the same amount of padding:

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity

8.4.4. Inline Replaced Elements

Inline replaced elements, such as images, are subject to a few crucial differences in how inline formatting is handled. This difference stems from the fact that replaced elements are still assumed to have an intrinsic height and width; for example, an image will be a certain number of pixels high and wide.

However, a replaced element with an intrinsic height can cause a line up with each other. If we had set the paragraph to have a text-align of center, then the centers of the line boxes would have lined up, and if it were set to justify, then each line box would be forced to be as wide as the paragraph's content area. The difference is made up in letter- and word-spacing, as we see in Figure 8-49.

Figure 8-49

Figure 8-49. Line-box layout with full justification

That pretty well covers how line boxes are generated, at least in the simplest cases. As we're about to see, however, the inline margins to be auto -- except for the left margin, which should be 3em :

H2 {margin-left: 3em;}

margin-left is one of four properties devoted to setting the margins on each of the four sides of an element box. Their names should come as little surprise.

margin-top, margin-right, margin-bottom, margin-left