Tuesday 25th of July 2017 02:29:11 PM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools

XML is an open standard

By making the W3C the keeper of the XML standard, it ensures that no one vendor should be able to cause interoperability problems to occur between systems that use the open standard. This should be reassuring to most companies making an investment in this technology, by being vendor neutral, this solution proposes to keep even small companies out of reach of big companies choosing to change the standards on them. For example, if a big company chooses to change the platform at its whim, then most other companies relying on that platform suffer. By keeping all data in XML and using XML in communications protocols, companies can maximize the lifetime of their investment in their products and solutions.

XML is language independent

By being language independent, XML bypasses the requirement to have a standard binary encoding or storage format. Language independence also fosters immense interoperability amongst heterogeneous systems. It is also good for future compatilbilty. For example, if in the future a product needs to be changed in order to deal with a new computing paradigm or network protocol, by keeping XML flowing through the system, addition of a new layer to deal with this change is feasible.

Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity

This all seems familiar enough, even when the boldfaced textstretches across multiple lines. Turn to Figure 7-61to see what happens with padding set on an inline element displayedacross multiple lines:

B {padding: 10px; background: silver;}
Figure 7-61

Figure 7-61. Padding on an inline element that spans multiple lines

As with margins, the left padding is applied to the beginning of theelement, and the right padding to the end of it; padding is

7.5.2. Single-Side Padding

You guessed it: there are properties that let you set the padding on a single side of the box, without affecting the other sides.

padding-top, padding-right, padding-bottom, padding-left

matters.