allowance, a user agent that is technically CSS1-compliant coulddisplay the following as all solid:

P.new3 {border-style: ridge dashed double;}

The result shown in Figure 7-35 wouldn't bewhat the author had in mind, of course, but it's technicallycorrect. So long as none andsolid are supported, and any other legal valuesare interpreted as solid, that's enough tobe CSS1-compliant. Accordingly, even though Navigator 4.x fails to

Friday 15th of December 2017 08:49:55 PM

Style Guide

CSS Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines 1, 2, 3
Introduction to CSS (with examples), CSS definitions and benefits, tips on authoring, plus extensive resources
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error–free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library's Web Coordinator.

Introduction

The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).


You can include a BASEFONT tag at the start of your BODY section to specify the font SIZE, and, for some browsers, font FACE and font COLOR for your page: 
<BASEFONT SIZE="n" FACE="name" COLOR="color">
where n=3 references the client browser's default font size, typically 12-point, so that the allowable  n values 1 through 7 typically reference 8, 10, 12, 14, 18, 24 and 36 points respectively; "name" references a font name (Arial, Times New Roman or whatever); and "color" is an RGB hexadecimal triple or one of the 16 namedparent element's text shows through the positioned element. Theonly way to avoid this is to set a background for the positionedelement.

Note that the boldface element in this case is positioned in relationto its parent element's content box, which defines itscontaining block. Without the relative positioning of the parentelement, the containing block would be another element. Consider acase where the element being positioned is a child of theBODY element, e.g., a paragraph or heading

5.4.1. Fonts with Style

font-style is very simple: it's used toselect between normal text,italic text, and oblique text.That's it! The only complications are in recognizing thedifference between italic and oblique text and knowing why browsersdon't always give you a choice anyway.

font-style