added to make the situation more clear):

P.aside {float: left; width: 5em; margin: 1em;}
Figure 7-64

Figure 7-64. A floating paragraph

One of the first interesting things tonotice about floated elements is that margins around floated elementsdo not collapse. If you float an image with 20-pixel margins, therewill be at least 20 pixels of space around that image. If otherelements adjacent to the image -- and that means adjacent

Saturday 18th of November 2017 04:52:37 PM

CSS Style Guide

 

This Style Guide explains the markup and design requirements for web projects, along with various standards and best practices.

projects authored in valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional and styled with valid Cascading Style Sheets will be described here. See the XHTML and CSS sections below for details. Additional sections of this Style Guide, coming soon, will provide information on writing for the web, naming and filing your documents, and other useful topics and guidelines.

XHTML: Guidelines & Benefits

Library projects must be authored in structural XHTML 1.0 Transitional. Page authors should follow accessibility guidelines in compliance with U.S. Law, and so that our site’s content will be made available to the widest possible number of people, browsers, and Internet devices. In addition, all XHTML must validate.

XHTML Guidelines
The rules of XHTML as compared to HTML—an easy transition
What is XML?
A brief introduction to the foundation of XHTML
XHTML Benefits
Four key benefits of converting from HTML to XHTML
XHTML Authoring Tips & Tools
Simplifying the work process—includes tips on thinking structurally, and tools for hand-coders and Dreamweaver users
XHTML Accessibility Tips
Making sure your pages can be read by all visitors, browsers, and devices
XHTML Validation
Ensuring interoperability by avoiding errors and sticking to standards

CSS: Style Sheets & Tips

Library projects must use valid Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) to control typography, color, and other layout elements. Style Sheets must be linked in a way that accommodates the capabilities of new and old browsers.

CSS Guidelines
Tips on authoring and linking to Style Sheets
Steal These Style Sheets!
Style Sheets for your use in Library projects
CSS Validation
Ensuring that your Style Sheets are error-free (same as XHTML validation)

A number of valid Style Sheets have been provided for your use. If you wish to create your own Style Sheets, please discuss your requirements with the Branch Library’s Web Coordinator.

link popularity

There is a lot of hype surrounding XML, and a lot of hype surrounding Java. Together these technologies propose to solve many of the most common (and persistent) general computing problems that have been around for the last 20 years. XML and Java are not revolutionary in the approach to solving these problems of interoperability of code and data across and within platform and application boundaries. Rather, XML and Java provide solutions to these problems by using the most successful strategies and techniques that have been honed and refined over the last 20 years of computing.

In the following paragraphs, I will highlight some of the most basic and important advantages that XML and Java provide to almost any system that uses them properly. This is by no means a comprehensive list of benefits, but items in this list should appear across just about any use of XML and Java technologies.

I will take a break from my normal pragmatic approach to getting you (the programmer) started with using XML and Java and just talk about the high level (design level) benefits of this wonderful combination. A good design is important to a good implementation for any system.

XML is structured

pixels (5px). You would expect the document to be rendered very much as shown in Figure 7-67.

Figure 7-67

Figure 7-67. Floating an image

Nothing unusual there, of course, but look what happens when we set the first paragraph to have a background, as has been done in Figure 7-68.

Figure 7-68

Figure 7-68. Floating images and element backgrounds

There is nothing different about the second example, except for the visible background. As you can see, the floated image sticks out of just below the top border of the second line. This is because theborder is actually drawn on the next pixel (assuming we'reusing a monitor) to the outside of each linebox. Since the line boxes are touching each other, their borders willoverlap as shown in Figure 8-46.

If we alter the SPAN styles to have a backgroundcolor, the actual placement of the line boxes becomes quite clear, aswe can see in Figure 8-47.