Monday 19th of March 2018 08:01:12 AM

CSS Style Guide

XHTML: Benefits

Converting from HTML to XHTML is easy, and provides the library with several immediate and long–term benefits:

A painless transition to more advanced technology
The web is moving to XML, a powerfully enabling technology. Writing well–formed, valid XHTML pages is the easiest way to begin this transition. All it takes is learning a few simple rules of XHTML markup.
Cleaner, more logical markup
XHTML brings uniformity to document structure. The rules of XHTML help restore the structural integrity of documents that was lost during the web’s rapid commercial expansion between 1994 and 2001. This is critical for large organizations such as ours, whose web pages must interface with logically–marked–up documents in legacy systems and databases.
Increased interoperability
Unlike old–style HTML pages, valid, well–formed XHTML documents can easily be “transported” to wireless devices, Braille readers and other specialized web environments. Moreover, XHTML’s insistence on clean, rule–based markup helps us avoid the kind of errors that can make web pages fail even in traditional browsers like Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator, and Opera Software’s Opera browser.
Greater accessibility
Because they follow strict rules and avoid non–standard markup, well–authored XHTML pages are more accessible than old–school HTML pages, helping the library comply with U.S. laws and accessibility guidelines.
« XHTML Section Index | XHTML Authoring Tips 'n Tools »

Figure 7-11

Figure 7-11. Percentage margins and changing environments

As you can imagine, this leads to the possibility of"fluid" pages, where the margins and padding of elementsenlarge or reduce to match the actual size of the display canvas. Intheory, as the user changes the width of a browser window, themargins and padding will expand or shrink dynamically -- but notevery browser supports this sort of behavior. Still, usingpercentages for margin andpadding may be the best way to set styles thatwill hold up in more than one media; for example, documents that will<OL> <LI>Item the first <LI CLASS="off">Item the second <LI>Item the third <LI CLASS="off">Item the fourth <LI>Item the fifth </OL>

Figure 7-80

Figure 7-80. Switching off list-item markers

list-style-type is inherited, so if you want to have different styles of bullet in nested lists, you'll need to

There are advantages and disadvantages to using some of the strategies to import and export XML. The complexity of your application data and available system resources are factors that would determine what strategy should be used.

Client and Server side - Application Servers

The 2nd category of Java applications called Java Application Servers (or app servers) and they make good use of XML. Unlike client side graphical Java apps (from the previous section) which are very standalone in their operations, app servers tie many different networked software components together in order to provide information from multiple sources to a set of client side Java apps or web browsers (maybe even running on different devices). This is shown in Figure 2. An app server is actually a conglomeration of several distributed and client/server software systems. So when you write an app server, you are actually writing many different software systems which are all networked to work together, to process information that comes from various sources, and distribute this information to a set of client apps (that you also have to write) running on different devices and platforms.