Sunday 24th of September 2017 01:26:44 AM

CSS Style Guide

XHTML: Benefits

8.2.2.2. Using auto

If only one of width , margin-left, or margin-right is set to a value of auto, while the others are given specific values, then the property set to be auto will evaluate to whatever length is required to make the element box's width equal the parent element's width. Thus, if the sum of the seven properties must equal 400 pixels, and no padding or borders are set, and the

Converting from HTML to XHTML is easy, and provides the library with several immediate and long–term benefits:

A painless transition to more advanced technology
The web is moving to XML, a powerfully enabling technology. Writing well–formed, valid XHTML pages is the easiest way to begin this transition. All it takes is learning a few simple rules of XHTML markup.
Cleaner, more logical markup
XHTML brings uniformity to document structure. The rules of XHTML help restore the structural integrity of documents that was lost during the web’s rapid commercial expansion between 1994 and 2001. This is critical for large organizations such as ours, whose web pages must interface with logically–marked–up documents in legacy systems and databases.
Increased interoperability
Unlike old–style HTML pages, valid, well–formed XHTML documents can easily be “transported” to wireless devices, Braille readers and other specialized web environments. Moreover, XHTML’s insistence on clean, rule–based markup helps us avoid the kind of errors that can make web pages fail even in traditional browsers like Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator, and Opera Software’s Opera browser.
Greater accessibility
Because they follow strict rules and avoid non–standard markup, well–authored XHTML pages are more accessible than old–school HTML pages, helping the library comply with U.S. laws and accessibility guidelines.
« XHTML Section Index | XHTML Authoring Tips 'n Tools »

people out there using these particular browsers, and they may well have major problems viewing your page if you use these comment tags.

1.4.5. CSS Comments

/* These are my styles! Yay! */

CSS text.

11.2.6. The Incredible Shrinking Text!

Here'sa fun thing to do: make your document text so small that itcan't be read by the human eye. You can do this using right along with it. This is because the element's containing block is the BODY element's content area, not the viewport. If you want to position elements so that they're placed relative to the viewport and don't scroll along with the rest of the document, then the next section is for you.

Before we get there, however, there are a few more things to cover. Remember that absolutely positioned boxes can have backgrounds, margins, borders, and padding; styles can be applied within them,

The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

XML is web enabled

XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible