Monday 22nd of January 2018 11:20:08 AM

CSS Style Guide

XHTML: Benefits

right colors and getting the coolest look for your pages, when itcomes right down to it, you'll probably spend most of your timeworrying about where text will go and how it will look. This concerngave rise to HTML tags such as <FONT> and<CENTER>, which give you some measure ofcontrol over the appearance and placement of text.

Because of this fact, much of CSS is concerned with properties thataffect text in one way or another. In CSS1, the properties are splitup into two sections: "Text Properties" and "Font

Converting from HTML to XHTML is easy, and provides the library with several immediate and long–term benefits:

A painless transition to more advanced technology
The web is moving to XML, a powerfully enabling technology. Writing well–formed, valid XHTML pages is the easiest way to begin this transition. All it takes is learning a few simple rules of XHTML markup.
Cleaner, more logical markup
XHTML brings uniformity to document structure. The rules of XHTML help restore the structural integrity of documents that was lost during the web’s rapid commercial expansion between 1994 and 2001. This is critical for large organizations such as ours, whose web pages must interface with logically–marked–up documents in legacy systems and databases.
Increased interoperability
Unlike old–style HTML pages, valid, well–formed XHTML documents can easily be “transported” to wireless devices, Braille readers and other specialized web environments. Moreover, XHTML’s insistence on clean, rule–based markup helps us avoid the kind of errors that can make web pages fail even in traditional browsers like Microsoft Internet Explorer, Netscape Navigator, and Opera Software’s Opera browser.
Greater accessibility
Because they follow strict rules and avoid non–standard markup, well–authored XHTML pages are more accessible than old–school HTML pages, helping the library comply with U.S. laws and accessibility guidelines.
« XHTML Section Index | XHTML Authoring Tips 'n Tools »

property color.

color

This property accepts as a value any valid color, as discussed in Chapter 3, "Units and Values", such as #FFCC00 or rgb(100%,80%,0%). It has the effect of setting the color of the text in the element, as shown in Figure 6-1:

<P STYLE="color: gray;">This paragraph has a gray foreground.</P>not the viewport. If you want to position elements so thatthey're placed relative to the viewport and don't scrollalong with the rest of the document, then the next section is foryou.

Before we get there, however, there are a few more things to cover.Remember that absolutely positioned boxes can have backgrounds,margins, borders, and padding; styles can be applied within them,just as with any other element. This can make them very useful forthe creation of sidebars, "sticky